lodging, travel tips

Should I Stay with Friends and Family When I Travel?!?

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Friends and Family:

Traveling where you have friends and family nearby is probably one of the most economical ways to find lodging. Your aunt lives in NYC and invites you to stay for a few days. You can have the spare bedroom. Most likely some meals. All free.

However be careful, she may be expecting you to babysit so her and husband can have a night on the town. I think staying with people works best if either you guys have the same agenda for the time you are together OR you have completely opposite schedules and they are simply offering you a place to sleep.

When I first started traveling, I primarily traveled where my friends and family were and stayed with them. It was a good way to start on a college kid’s budget.

Eventually I moved to more solo travel. Staying where I wanted to go and normally traveling alone.

Now, I find that I prefer to travel with people. And then find our own housing. I love my friends and my family and am thankful for all the times so many of them have hosted me. But the freedom of having your own place if hard to beat.

If you want to just spend time with that friend or family member, by all means stay with them. Or if your budget requires you to find a free place, by all means go for it. But if you desire ultimate freedom this may not be your best option.

Keep up with my latest adventures and photos 🙂

Follow JELTOWN on Instagram, FacebookTwitter and now on YouTube!

Save money by traveling like I do

$35 off your first Airbnb booking!

Check out the Equipment I use

Nikon D3300
Nikkor 18-140mm Zoom Lens
Tokina 11-16mm f/2.8 AT-X116 Pro DX II

adventure, city reviews, places, travel tips

Horseshoe Bend, Antelope Canyon, and Page Arizona

Page Arizona is a small, desert town right next to the lake Powell Dam on the Colorado River. It is probably on the map primarily due to two popular tourist attractions nearby besides Lake Powell: Horseshoe Bend on the Colorado River and Antelope Canyon in Navajo Nation.

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View of Horseshoe Bend at Sunrise with the sunlight reflecting off distant clouds, great lighting this time of day!

Horseshoe Bend is a spectacular vista point on the river where the Colorado takes a sharp turn shaped like a horseshoe with deep canyon walls resembling the Grand Canyon but smaller. While not as grand as the larger canyon, this area is certainly large enough to invoke awe. Below are a few tips

Sunset vs Sunrise: The sun sets almost directly behind horseshoe bend overlook. So the site can be spectacular but the lighting can be hard to capture. Sunrise from behind gives better lighting if you can get up early enough but you will be facing away from the sun.

Crowds: This is a popular spot. English speaking American’s are probably a minority here which is super cool. For whatever reason this is a very popular place with international travelers. It certainly is spectacular. But can also be quite crowded. Go in the winter, on a week day, early morning for best results.

Temperature: Both times I went it was cold. In fact there has been snow there as the winters can be rather cold. But remember it is a dry desert and in the summer can be sweltering. So bring water!

Getting there: Tons of parking with bathrooms! I’ve never had trouble parking at all. The hike is approximately 0.4 miles each way. You briefly walk up a hill an then the rest is downhill (with the reverse on the way back).

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Where to shoot: The middles (where the most tourist are) is the symmetrical image classic to Horseshoe Bend. However, going to the right (and I’m sure the left as well), offers incredible alternative perspectives equally as beautiful if not so symmetrical. Walk around and don’t just shoot from one spot (like so many people there do).

Antelope Canyon is the most famous of many slot canyons that dot the desert landscape around Page. Upper Antelope Canyon is the primary place that people visit here. However, there is also Lower Antelope Canyon, and numerous less famous ones that one can potentially visit as well.

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Visiting: First pick your canyon. Upper is the most popular and is easy to get to but the other options can be beautiful too. Next pick a tour agency and preferably book in advance to secure your spot. Because this land is owned and operated by the Navajo Nation, they create the regulations for its use. Due to overuse and vandalism, guided tours are required to limit the number of visitors and to protect the beautiful landscape.

I recommend Antelope Canyon Tours Inc. I used them and enjoyed my tour immensely with an excellent tour guide and quick reasonable service. They are highly rated on Yelp as well. Total cost was about $40/person with optional tip (I tipped because I thought she was exceptional but didn’t notice anyone else doing so). Its a bit more expensive during the summer.

Getting The Photo: The photo that everyone wants to get here is that classic image of the light streaming down through the slot into the darker canyon. Its a beautiful shot. To get it you have to go close to noon when the sun is the highest. The canyon will be quite crowded so you may want to take a photo tour which allows more time and privacy (DSLR and tripod required to eliminate more casual tourists).

However, remember, the classic photo isn’t the only aspect of beauty here. A good tour guide will point out exceptionally beautiful spots in the canyon that require no special lighting or positioning of the sun. I went at 3pm and got some awesome photos!

Set your camera up before you go based on current lighting conditions and be prepared to shoot quick. The tour is fun but somewhat rushed as there are lots of people trying to see the canyon all the time. If you go in the winter and later in the day the canyon is much more deserted.

Page Arizona is a small, touristy, southwestern town. There isn’t a whole lot to do there besides the two main things I just mentioned and anything to do with Lake Powell (which is currently quite low). Zion National Park, Bryce Canyon, and Grand Canyon are all within 2-3 hours which makes it possible to use Page as a base camp. Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park is also nearby and quite enjoyable to visit.

Where to Stay: We stayed in the Motel 6 in Page Arizona. It was newly remodeled. Very inexpensive (about $50/night). Quite clean. Nicely decorated (simple Ikea style). And very close to everything (10 minutes or less).  We looked at some of the other budget hotels and some nicer ones, but none seemed to give the same value for the money.

Where to Eat: For dinner we ate at a local American style Mexican restaurant called El Tapatio which was quite delicious. It seemed popular with tourist and locals alike as there was a 20 minute wait on a random week-day night. Other than that there didn’t seem to be many good local restaurants, coffee shops, or bars though I’m sure there are a few gems we missed.

Keep up with my latest adventures and photos 🙂

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Save money by traveling like I do

$35 off your first Airbnb booking!

Check out the Equipment I use

Nikon D3300
Nikkor 18-140mm Zoom Lens
Tokina 11-16mm f/2.8 AT-X116 Pro DX II

camera, photography, travel tips

How do I get my Photos?

People often ask me how I get such amazing shots (their words not mine). I don’t think my shots are that impressive most of the time. They certainly aren’t professional yet. And I would love if you guys would give me some constructive feedback on how to improve.

However, I would love to share the few tips I do have so far on getting these shots, including setting, timing, location, equipment, and editing.

Lets start with the gear that I use.

For panorama shots, videos, and certain difficulty lighting situations (where HDR setting is best), I actually use my Samsung Galaxy S7. I wish they would sponsor me haha. Some of my best photos come from this phone. I use an Auto or Panorama setting occasionally using the HDR option on Auto. That’s it!

Brand New cost $600

My DSLR camera is a Nikon D3300. This is a crop sensor (as opposed to full-frame) entry level DSLR with a surprising number of options including full manual settings.

Brand New about $460

My favorite lens is the highly rated Nikon AF-S Nikkor 18-140mm 1:3.5-5.6 DX VR zoom lens. This lens has an auto focus that is usually accurate and a manual focus which I find somewhat stiff to adjust precisely. I hope to upgrade to a professional grade lens soon.

Brand New about $500

My second favorite lens is the Tokina SD 11-16 F2.8 (IF) DX which works with Nikon though I’m not sure if the auto focus is accurate. I use this for wide-angle photos of landscapes at least 7 feet away (the manual mode for this lens adjusts to infinite after 7 feet. Make sure the focus marker is perfectly in line with the infinite symbol ∞.

Brand New cost $450

Besides that I also use multiple SD cards, preferring smaller 4gb ones over larger ones, some filters (Neutral Density filters to extend exposure time and Graduated Neutral Density filters for differing exposures). I need to purchase a Polarizing filter next to reduce glare. I also use an SD to Micro USB converter that allows me to directly put photos from my DSLR to my phone for Instagram posting on the go. I also own an older manual Nikon Nikkor.C 1:4.5 f=80-200mm zoom lens. It’s a really nice older lens that works well on most Nikon camera.

I’m looking to upgrade to a professional grade Camera and am torn between the Nikon D810, Canon Mark III or IV, and the Sony Alpha a7R II Mirrorless. Any suggestions or opinions?

Happy Travels!

 

Keep up with my latest adventures and photos 🙂

Follow JELTOWN on Instagram, FacebookTwitter and now on YouTube!

Save money by traveling like I do

$35 off your first Airbnb booking!

Check out the Equipment I use

Nikon D3300
Nikkor 18-140mm Zoom Lens
Tokina 11-16mm f/2.8 AT-X116 Pro DX II

 

 

lodging, travel tips

Affordable Lodging and World Travel

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How do I afford housing while I am traveling? Especially when I am usually paying rent on at least one place in the US during the same time?

One of the first places I look when friends complain about not being able to afford travel, is at how much they spend on hotels. I rarely spend more than $25/per person per night when traveling. And yet I see people who will literally spend $300/night on a weekend in LA and who can’t seem to understand how I travel so much more than they do. If I spent that much per night traveling, I honestly don’t think I could afford more than 3 weeks a year if that!

I’ll be honest, I don’t need anything super fancy when I travel. I don’t find that the return on investment is usually worth it. Most of the things I want to do don’t involve the place I am lodging in. I’m not one to spend hours relaxing at a resort.

But I also like my privacy. I’ve done the bunk beds. I’ve done the couches. They work for a time. But they aren’t my favorite option. I prefer a bit of relatively clean place to unwind at the end of the night.

Thus most of my suggestions focus on this niche: people who want to travel economically, who want some privacy, who want something clean, but nothing fancy, nothing over the top, no extra champagne perks if you will.

There are basically five ways to stay when traveling: hotels, hostels, Airbnb, Camping, and with friends or family.  If course there are more which I will briefly cover, but these are the primary ones that I use. Let me explain how I use each one to its fullest potential in the following articles which I will post over the next few weeks! Stay tuned 🙂

Happy Travels!

Keep up with my latest adventures and photos 🙂

Follow JELTOWN on Instagram, FacebookTwitter and now on YouTube!

Save money by traveling like I do

$35 off your first Airbnb booking!

Check out the Equipment I use

Nikon D3300
Nikkor 18-140mm Zoom Lens
Tokina 11-16mm f/2.8 AT-X116 Pro DX II

Norway

Some of my Favorite Norway Photos and Where I Took Them

Norway has a ton of exciting places to visit that I haven’t had the time to see yet. Like the tallest mountain in the country which apparently has an ice tube carved into it by adventurous climbers where you can literally slide down the mountain once your reach the top. Or what about the famous rock left balancing between two cliffs overhanging a fjord (Kjeragbolten)? Even Pulpit Rock, which is often super crowded, is supposed to be an amazing site to see. But guess what? It was covered in fog when I spent 4 whole hours strenuously climbing to the top and I didn’t get to see a damn thing!

The following destinations are all nearby to Flåm, a popular tourist and vacation spot on Norway’s largest fjord just a few hours away from Bergen.

Stalheimskleiva

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Stalheimskleiva is a scenic spot on a narrow winding mountain pass near Flam Norway. The valley below is green and fertile with innumerable waterfalls flowing off the sides and grassy farmland filling the middle. This was one of my favorite views in all of Norway that did not involve a Fjord. To get here you have to leave the main highway which tunnels under the mountain before resurfacing in the valley. You will also get stunning views of Stalheimsfossen (126 meter horsetail waterfall) and Sivlefossen. At the bottom of the hill there is a small parking area and some hiking trails which I’m sure are beautiful although I haven’t done them yet myself.

 

Kjelfossen

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Continue following the main road (E16) for another couple of kilometers and you will come to Kjelfossen, one of Norway’s tallest waterfalls. This photo hardly does it justice but I thought the clouds midway up made the scene absolutely epic. The falls is approximately 755 meters tall or 2,477 feet tall. Apparently it is a popular ice climbing destination in Norway. The entire area is breath-taking and to the east is a harbor for the ferry to Flam. Or if you prefer you can take the E16 as I did.

Stegastein

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Stegastein is a view-point overlooking the part of the Sognefjorden fjord where Flam is. This fjord is the largest in Norway and the second largest in the world and is absolutely beautiful. You must see it and this is one of the best viewpoints. In fact all along this road are numerous overlooks and pull outs to get a better idea of the land’s beauty.

All three of these sites can be seen and enjoyed in a single day trip from Bergen as we did this summer with time to spare.

Happy Travels!

Keep up with my latest adventures and photos 🙂

Follow JELTOWN on Instagram, FacebookTwitter and now on YouTube!

Save money by traveling like I do

$35 off your first Airbnb booking!

Check out the Equipment I use

Nikon D3300
Nikkor 18-140mm Zoom Lens
Tokina 11-16mm f/2.8 AT-X116 Pro DX II

travel tips

Travel really IS for everyone, and don’t let people tell you otherwise

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Matador Network (whom I frequently read and enjoy) recently posted an article entitled LET’S STOP PRETENDING THAT TRAVEL IS ACCESSIBLE TO EVERYONE.

Sounds intriguing right? I am well aware of the numerous posts out there saying that anyone can travel! And I’ve much enjoyed learning their tips on how to make it happen.

However, this author apparently feels that this is unfair to many people whom he believes just aren’t privileges enough to travel like him.

I could not disagree more. Sure there are a few situations that may temporarily or very rarely permanently inhibit travel. However, for people in the west (whom his audience is directed), really have very few excuses not to travel.

Having children is one of the most frequent ones I hear. And yet I know penniless young single mom’s who travel the country, child in tow. It takes resourcefulness and hard work, but in no way is a privilege.

The author states that if you didn’t come from money than you probably never thought of traveling. I completely disagree. I came from extreme poverty (by American standards, though I never lacked what I needed). And yet from a very young age I dreamed of travel. And the desire awoke even more fully when I was working and paying my way through college.

Some of the most traveled people out here in the west coast are homeless hobos, hopping from city to city. While I don’t condone their lifestyle, it just shows that money isn’t the privilege that make travel a possibility.

And on top of that, travel is super cheap! If you are willing to put in the work and discipline, you can literally do a trip for about the cost of buying the latest smart phone.

The biggest problem that people have is not living within their means. And this problem affects people of all level of income, privileged and oppressed. Its part of the curse of the so-called American Dream (which in my opinion is more of a night mare).

I am a travel nurse at the age of 30 and finally make a good living by most people standards. I know how much it costs to live where I do and how much most nurses make. There is absolutely no reason why any nurse in my area should not be able to travel fairly often. And yet all the time I get the question “how on earth do you travel so much? how do you afford it? I’m so jealous”.

I will go into more details on how I afford to travel so much in future posts. So stay tuned.

But suffice to say, I went overseas raising my own money, on a humanitarian trip for 10 days at the age of 16. At the age of 23 I did 3 weeks in Costa Rica using my own money while waiting tables (only 25 hours a week) and paying for college. Granted I took out some extra loans which I later paid off, but they were interest free student loans so I figured it was worth it.

I have never had the privilege of money. Certainly I am aware of numerous other privileges and understand how not having these can make it harder to travel. But don’t let that be a crutch.

If you are truly serious about traveling the world begin thinking about ways you can eliminate expenses and increase your income. Don’t get into a serious relationship. Don’t have a kid. Don’t buy a house. Don’t get that new car. Learn how to leverage credit cards to your advantage. Don’t go out to eat. Don’t buy drinks at bars (especially fancy cocktails…what a rip off!). Don’t buy name brand clothing. The list goes on.

When someone writes an article about how not everyone can afford to travel or has the privilege of being able to, I just think about how many people I’ve met who I know make way less than I do and yet drive a brand new $30k car or have expensive designer clothing. There is nothing wrong with that. But don’t tell me how you can’t afford to travel.

And yes there are still some people in our country who are destitute, hungry, trapped in their circumstances. These are people who need a hand up from society to get back on their feet…but this is a travel blog, not a political blog.

Happy Travels!

Keep up with my latest adventures and photos 🙂

Follow JELTOWN on Instagram, FacebookTwitter and now on YouTube!

Save money by traveling like I do

$35 off your first Airbnb booking!

Check out the Equipment I use

Nikon D3300
Nikkor 18-140mm Zoom Lens
Tokina 11-16mm f/2.8 AT-X116 Pro DX II

travel tips

How do I afford to travel so much?

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Happy Holidays my dear readers and fellow adventurers. This seemed like an appropriate topic to cover on the holiday 🙂

Yes I know this article has been done a million times, by much better bloggers and more experienced travelers than myself. However, I never get tired of reading these articles and getting new ideas.

I also believe that travel and experience is exceptionally unique and should by tailored accordingly. Thus, the crazy safari jungle vacations of one might be a night mare to another and hostels may seem like a dream to some and a bad horror movie to others.

So let me tell you in brief how I afford to travel, some basics on how much I travel, how much it costs, and then in the future delve into the details of each item that I address quickly here. I’ve placed links throughout of things that help me with my travels. None are sponsored, but even if they were, I would only give you stuff I actually use!

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The basics:

I travel cheap. Not sleep under a bridge cheap. Not even always staying in a $10/night hostel. And not always to the cheapest countries (Norway and Iceland twice). But far cheaper than most people I know. I don’t spend money going out to fancy restaurants, flying first class, staying in the Ritz Carlton, etc.

I live a lifestyle and that helps me save money. I drink occasionally but try for inexpensive drinks. I rarely spend more than than $30 on a night dinner. I don’t go to expensive events often. I wear inexpensive clothes and have inexpensive housing.

My job is one of the best jobs I can get in my field without sacrificing flexibility. And I work to maximize my income/time-spent-working ratio.

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Flying:

Skyscanner and Monodo are my favorite tools to find cheap flights. I try to plan ahead and constantly research flights to different places I am interested in so I know what a good deal is when I see one.

I play the credit card game inspired and popularized by The Points Guy. Basically, I open airline credit cards offering good bonuses for minimum spending amounts and use the card till I get the bonus, than I move on to the next one.

When it comes to booking a flight, I optimize my miles. Miles are best used for domestic flights. If the flight can be purchased for under $100, I won’t use miles. Between $100-200 I will consider miles. And if over $200, than I almost never pay for a flight.

I hardly ever check bags, use only a personal item when flying budget, and don’t pay for upgrades. Two years ago I went to Europe and took 7 more flights while there and spent less than $800 on all 8 flights including the one way flight to Europe (I used miles to return home).

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Debt:

I try to avoid dept. Unfortunately I bought a house and have a mortgage which I won’t be doing again. I also bought a car with a car payment and then worked hard to pay it off as quick as possible. Same with my school loans. I never keep credit card debt. My goal is to sell my house and be completely debt free by 2018.

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Working:

Find a job that is conducive to your travel desires. Whether its something flexible, something that pays you to travel, something you can take with you when you travel, or something that just pays enough that you can afford to leave it to travel. What ever you have to do to make it work.

You can afford to travel while waiting tables. I’ve done it. Take a second waiting job if necessary.

And if you have career experience, a bachelors or higher education, and a decent middle class earning ability, you have no excuse not to travel more.

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Family and relationships:

These are both important. Don’t give up on family or friends. However if traveling is your desire, you may have to do it without them. I remember the moment I realized that if forced to choose I’d pick travel over my now ex. Good choice.

It may also mean postponing or opting out of having your own family. I don’t have kids. I don’t want them. Probably ever. Not that you can’t travel with them. But I don’t really see the idea of having them as adding to my happiness, especially as much as unencumbered travel.

Good people who also want to travel and share your values usually aren’t found at home. I have some of the world’s best friends at one of my growing number of world home bases in the fine city of Washington DC. These are lovely, amazing, fun friends. Yet most don’t travel very much. So I’ve learned to make new friends and build new relationships on the fly wherever I am traveling to.

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Living withing your means:

This is the hardest thing for most people I know who want to travel more. They simply can’t get into the habit of living withing their means. I think I had an unfair advantage as my parents were very much against debt, we were very poor, and we learned how to do a lot with very little.

Several steps I take to live within my means include:

1). Don’t eat out, when you do realize the law of diminishing returns: more expensive meals are generally lower return per dollar. In other words, if an $8 burger ranks a 7 and a $20 burger ranks a 9 the $8 burger returns almost double the value on the dollar.

2). Drive an economical older car that you can buy with cash. I recommend a 6-12 year old Honda, Acura, Toyota, Lexus, Hyundai, or similar (I drive a 2004 Acura TL with 160k miles…works great)

3). Use craigslist (with care) and social media to find cheaper living opportunities. I live in a small but completely adequate in-law suit for well below the market average in my area

4). Remember than memories, people, and experiences are almost always more gratifying in both the short term and the long term than possessions are. So spend accordingly.

5). Look at every bill you have and evaluate how you can save without negatively impacting your life. I have long desired to switch from Verizon’s top tier prices to something cheaper. However, consistently over the past 8 years, I have had better service than friends using other providers in the US to the point that I have yet to be convinced to switch. But if it was the only way I could afford to travel….you bet I would switch right now!

6). You don’t need new clothes that often. You don’t need to go to brunch. You can wait for that new movie to hit Netflix.

Thats it for now. Check back soon for more tips and tricks on how I travel so much. Leave a comment below if you have some of your own ideas!!

Happy Travels!

Keep up with my latest adventures and photos 🙂

Save money by traveling like I do

$40 off your first Airbnb booking!

 

country profiles, iceland

Epic spots off the beaten path in Iceland

One thing I’d like to say here before I give you guys a few more awesome adventure to behold. All these places in Iceland I’m suggesting are aboslutely free. Just show up and enjoy. That being said: please take care of the environment. Pick up your trash. Stay on the trails (ok mostly, just don’t damage things). And leave the place better than you found it.

 

Dettifoss, Selfoss, Hafragilsfoss, and the Jökulsa Canyon

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Pictured above is me jumping over Europe’s most powerful waterfall, Dettifoss. Ok not exactly jumping over it. But pretty damn close to the edge. This spectacular site can be reached in the north west corner of Iceland about 7 hours from the capital Reykjavik.

Personally I like the less famous but in my opinion more beautiful Selfoss just a short walk upstream from this waterfall. Its the same river with the same volume of water spread out in a horseshoe shape with numerous falls separated by small rock islands.

Further downstream from both is the Jokulsa Canyon and the Hafragilsfoss, both of which I haven’t visited yet. Supposedly the canyon is one of the most beautiful spots in Iceland and I will be sure to update you guys when I go!

Even further down is the Ásbyrgi Canyon which is supposedly amazing too (the pictures appear so!).

Learn more about this are on the official website here

 

Glymur

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Glymur is arguably the tallest waterfall in the country of Iceland. It is also an abdolutely gorgeous canyon with well marked, excellent hiking trails and is not too far from Reykjavik to the north. The photo above shows me looking over the cliffs downstream from Glymur itself. The gorge is filled with greenery and flowers, and up above is a beautiful stream cutting its way through a large meadow surrounded by mountains. The hike is about a two mile loop that involves a river crossing if you want to see both sides and a lot of uphill climbing. Not for the fain hearted but requiring no special skills either.

Jökulsárlón – Glacier Lagoon

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Jökulsárlón is a large lake at the base of Iceland’s largest glacier, Breiðamerkurjökull. The lake then spills into the ocean allowing icebergs of various sizes to float into the oncoming waves. The waves the wash these icebergs onto the beautiful black sand beaches of Jökulsárlón Ice Beach. Its a spectacular site. Off in the distance you can see the tallest mountains of Iceland towering over a mile above the beaches below (see the photo above). \

Happy Travels!

Keep up with my latest adventures and photos 🙂

Follow JELTOWN on Instagram, FacebookTwitter and now on YouTube!

Save money by traveling like I do

$35 off your first Airbnb booking!

Check out the Equipment I use

Nikon D3300
Nikkor 18-140mm Zoom Lens
Tokina 11-16mm f/2.8 AT-X116 Pro DX II

travel

A quick guide to visiting Iceland (part 3)

Icelandic Horses running through a field
Icelandic Horses running through a field

I didn’t realize there was so much to tell about Iceland. So here it is part 3!

Nightlife

Iceland has a surprisingly thriving nightlife given its size. Locals tell me that everyone there drinks. A lot. And when you go out you see this. Many of the people out at the bars and clubs are locals, not just tourists.

Reykjavik is home to a metro population of about 200,000 or almost 2/3 of the population of the island. While the town is relatively small, it still offers a wide range of bars and clubs, from jazzy coffee shops serving whiskey late into the morning to ritzy night clubs with fancy cock-tales, to American style sports bars with more TVs than patrons. Everything is scaled down to the size of the country but there is still something for everyone.

If you like night life, I’d recommend taking one night to thoroughly enjoy it while in Iceland. If you go during the summer you will get to have the very odd experience of walking out of a club and finding it quite light outside almost as if you partied till 7am, except its only 2!

Alcohol 

Speaking of nightlife, alcohol is extremely expensive in Iceland. Even buying your on liquor or beer and mixing your own drinks can cost a lot. For example, the last time I went to Iceland I bout a 500ml bottle of regular Smirnoff Vodka for about $32. Meanwhile in your bars and clubs drinks start at about $15. Beers are about $9.

If you want to drink in Iceland and want to save money, I highly recommend buying duty free alcohol in the airport before you leave and taking it with you.

Culture and Art

I don’t have as much experience with the culture and art of Iceland but there is plenty to be had if you are interested. pretty much anywhere there are tourists, you can find hand made crafts and goods which may be a bit expensive but are usually beautifully done and support the local economy. Downtown Reykjavik has tons of shops with art, pottery, wool, and much more. There are also performing arts in the city as well

Happy Travels!

Keep up with my latest adventures and photos 🙂

Follow JELTOWN on Instagram, FacebookTwitter and now on YouTube!

Save money by traveling like I do

$35 off your first Airbnb booking!

Check out the Equipment I use

Nikon D3300
Nikkor 18-140mm Zoom Lens
Tokina 11-16mm f/2.8 AT-X116 Pro DX II